Current Schedule

Mar
27
Fri
A MOST VIOLENT YEAR
Mar 27 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(2014) Written and directed by J. C. Chandor. Cast: Oscar Isaac, Jessica Chastain, Albert Brooks, David Oyelowo, Alessandro Nivola.

Walking through Times Square today, it is easy to forget New York City, circa 1981 – one of its most violent years, when trash filled the streets, and graffiti covered the subway cars. Director J.C. Chandor (Margin Call, All Is Lost) remembers, recreating a city – and a man – on the edge of disaster. Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis) runs a heating oil company trying to stay on the legit side of the business, even as his competitors turn up the heat. It doesn’t help that his wife (a slinky Jessica Chastain), the daughter of a mobster, thinks he may be going about it the wrong way. 125 min.

“As a great New York story, it’s also a great American story about ambition and failure, about the kind of people who make it, the kinds who don’t, and all the things that can go wrong.”
Mick La Salle, San Francisco Chronicle.

Website

Mar
28
Sat
A MOST VIOLENT YEAR
Mar 28 @ 2:30 pm – 2:30 pm

(2014) Written and directed by J. C. Chandor. Cast: Oscar Isaac, Jessica Chastain, Albert Brooks, David Oyelowo, Alessandro Nivola.

Walking through Times Square today, it is easy to forget New York City, circa 1981 – one of its most violent years, when trash filled the streets, and graffiti covered the subway cars. Director J.C. Chandor (Margin Call, All Is Lost) remembers, recreating a city – and a man – on the edge of disaster. Oscar Isaac (Inside Llewyn Davis) runs a heating oil company trying to stay on the legit side of the business, even as his competitors turn up the heat. It doesn’t help that his wife (a slinky Jessica Chastain), the daughter of a mobster, thinks he may be going about it the wrong way. 125 min.

“As a great New York story, it’s also a great American story about ambition and failure, about the kind of people who make it, the kinds who don’t, and all the things that can go wrong.”
Mick La Salle, San Francisco Chronicle.

Website

STOP MAKING SENSE
Mar 28 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(US, 1984) Directed by Jonathan Demme. Director of photography: Jordan Cronenweth. With: David Byrne, Chris Frantz, Jerry Harrison, Tina Weymouth.

Calling all Cinestudio alumni! And, of course, fans of the Talking Heads and Punk/New Wave music from any artificially determined generational bracket! For one night only, the 80s will live again (minus the politics), The Talking Heads will all be getting along, and their incredible music will fill our hearts and minds. If you haven’t seen this concert film, directed by Jonathan Demme, it begins with a close up of David Byrne’s sneakers moving across the stage, as he kicks off with an intense version of Psycho Killer. With each new song, another member of the band joins in, with blistering performances of Life During Wartime, Heaven, Once in a Lifetime and Burnin’ Down the House. Be there and join in a night of music and friendship. “Real beauty knocks you a little bit off kilter.” - David Byrne. 88 min.

A restoration of a longtime favorite celebrating Cinestudio’s 45th Anniversary.

Mar
29
Sun
NT LIVE: A VIEW FROM THE BRIDGE (Encore)
Mar 29 @ 1:00 pm – 1:00 pm

(UK, 2015) Director: Ivo van Hove. Stage play by Arthur Miller. Cast: Mark Strong, Nicola Walker, Michael Gould, Phoebe Fox, Emun Elliott and Luke Norris.

The visionary Ivo van Hove directs this stunning, stripped down production of Miller’s tragic masterpiece, broadcast live from London’s West End by National Theatre Live! Don’t miss a stellar cast led by Mark Strong (The Imitation Game, and Tinker, Tailor, Soldier, Spy) in the Young Vic’s electrifying production of A View from the Bridge – the Guardian and Independent’s top theater pick of 2014. The great Arthur Miller confronts the American dream in this dark and passionate tale. In Brooklyn, longshoreman Eddie Carbone welcomes his Sicilian cousins to the land of freedom. But when one of them falls for his beautiful niece, Eddie’s jealous mistrust exposes a deep, unspeakable secret.
“One moment you sympathize with the person you hate, then in the next scene you hate somebody you love… I love this ambiguity.” – Director Ivo van Hove.


Tickets

TIMBUKTU
Mar 29 @ 4:00 pm – 4:00 pm

(Mauritania, 2014) Director: Abderrahmane Sissako. Screenplay by Abderrahmane Sissako and Kessen Tall. Cast: Ibrahim Ahmed, a.k.a. Pino, Toulou Kiki, Abel Jafri, Fatoumata Diawara.

A nominee for the best foreign-language film Oscar®, Timbuktu became a political hot potato in France, where the mayor of a town outside Paris banned it for supposed sympathy for jihadists, and Islamists criticized it for making them look like hypocrites. Set in the traditionally tolerant and diverse hub of Timbuktu, Abderrahmane Sissako’s film looks at how life changed for ordinary people when radical jihadists took over in northern Mali in 2012. Quietly furious, Sissako reveals all-too-human young men who can’t live up to their own fundamentalist ideals, but still force their harsh rules onto a population just trying to get by. 97 min.

“Timbuktu is a political film in the way that The Bicycle Thief or Modern Times is a political film: It feels at once timely and permanent, immediate and essential.” – A. O. Scott, New York Times.


Website

TIMBUKTU
Mar 29 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(Mauritania, 2014) Director: Abderrahmane Sissako. Screenplay by Abderrahmane Sissako and Kessen Tall. Cast: Ibrahim Ahmed, a.k.a. Pino, Toulou Kiki, Abel Jafri, Fatoumata Diawara.

A nominee for the best foreign-language film Oscar®, Timbuktu became a political hot potato in France, where the mayor of a town outside Paris banned it for supposed sympathy for jihadists, and Islamists criticized it for making them look like hypocrites. Set in the traditionally tolerant and diverse hub of Timbuktu, Abderrahmane Sissako’s film looks at how life changed for ordinary people when radical jihadists took over in northern Mali in 2012. Quietly furious, Sissako reveals all-too-human young men who can’t live up to their own fundamentalist ideals, but still force their harsh rules onto a population just trying to get by. 97 min.

“Timbuktu is a political film in the way that The Bicycle Thief or Modern Times is a political film: It feels at once timely and permanent, immediate and essential.” – A. O. Scott, New York Times.


Website

Mar
30
Mon
TIMBUKTU
Mar 30 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(Mauritania, 2014) Director: Abderrahmane Sissako. Screenplay by Abderrahmane Sissako and Kessen Tall. Cast: Ibrahim Ahmed, a.k.a. Pino, Toulou Kiki, Abel Jafri, Fatoumata Diawara.

A nominee for the best foreign-language film Oscar®, Timbuktu became a political hot potato in France, where the mayor of a town outside Paris banned it for supposed sympathy for jihadists, and Islamists criticized it for making them look like hypocrites. Set in the traditionally tolerant and diverse hub of Timbuktu, Abderrahmane Sissako’s film looks at how life changed for ordinary people when radical jihadists took over in northern Mali in 2012. Quietly furious, Sissako reveals all-too-human young men who can’t live up to their own fundamentalist ideals, but still force their harsh rules onto a population just trying to get by. 97 min.

“Timbuktu is a political film in the way that The Bicycle Thief or Modern Times is a political film: It feels at once timely and permanent, immediate and essential.” – A. O. Scott, New York Times.


Website

Mar
31
Tue
TIMBUKTU
Mar 31 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(Mauritania, 2014) Director: Abderrahmane Sissako. Screenplay by Abderrahmane Sissako and Kessen Tall. Cast: Ibrahim Ahmed, a.k.a. Pino, Toulou Kiki, Abel Jafri, Fatoumata Diawara.

A nominee for the best foreign-language film Oscar®, Timbuktu became a political hot potato in France, where the mayor of a town outside Paris banned it for supposed sympathy for jihadists, and Islamists criticized it for making them look like hypocrites. Set in the traditionally tolerant and diverse hub of Timbuktu, Abderrahmane Sissako’s film looks at how life changed for ordinary people when radical jihadists took over in northern Mali in 2012. Quietly furious, Sissako reveals all-too-human young men who can’t live up to their own fundamentalist ideals, but still force their harsh rules onto a population just trying to get by. 97 min.

“Timbuktu is a political film in the way that The Bicycle Thief or Modern Times is a political film: It feels at once timely and permanent, immediate and essential.” – A. O. Scott, New York Times.


Website

Apr
1
Wed
MR. TURNER
Apr 1 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(UK/France/Germany, 2014) Written and directed by Michael Leigh. Cast: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson, Marion Bailey, Paul Jesson, Lesley Manville, Martin Savage.

Nothing is more tedious than a movie biopic that tries to turn its star creative (or political, or athletic) genius into a person of equally sterling character. Thankfully, the new film on the last decades of the great 19th century English artist J. M. W. Turner is the work of director Mike Leigh, who has made a career (Secrets and Lies, High Hopes, Topsy-Turvy) of showing the truth of peoples’ lives. As Turner, Timothy Spall is a complicated, brusque, pursuer of experience and beauty, a single-minded man who is uninterested in high society, or even his family. Spall won the Best Actor Award at Cannes Film Festival, as did cinematographer Dick Pope, who eerily captures the radiant beauty of the landscapes that Turner painted. 150 min.

“Turner has long been a passion for Leigh, who typically discovers his films through improvisation and rehearsal. Here he’s on a more direct line, and there’s no doubt it’s his masterpiece.” – New York Times


Website

Apr
2
Thu
MR. TURNER
Apr 2 @ 7:30 pm – 7:30 pm

(UK/France/Germany, 2014) Written and directed by Michael Leigh. Cast: Timothy Spall, Dorothy Atkinson, Marion Bailey, Paul Jesson, Lesley Manville, Martin Savage.

Nothing is more tedious than a movie biopic that tries to turn its star creative (or political, or athletic) genius into a person of equally sterling character. Thankfully, the new film on the last decades of the great 19th century English artist J. M. W. Turner is the work of director Mike Leigh, who has made a career (Secrets and Lies, High Hopes, Topsy-Turvy) of showing the truth of peoples’ lives. As Turner, Timothy Spall is a complicated, brusque, pursuer of experience and beauty, a single-minded man who is uninterested in high society, or even his family. Spall won the Best Actor Award at Cannes Film Festival, as did cinematographer Dick Pope, who eerily captures the radiant beauty of the landscapes that Turner painted. 150 min.

“Turner has long been a passion for Leigh, who typically discovers his films through improvisation and rehearsal. Here he’s on a more direct line, and there’s no doubt it’s his masterpiece.” – New York Times


Website