Current Schedule

Feb
8
Mon
SUFFRAGETTE
Feb 8 @ 7:30 pm

(UK, 2015) Director: Sarah Gavron. Screenplay by Abi Morgan. Cast: Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Meryl Streep, Brendan Gleeson, Ben Whishaw.

Don’t miss the chance to watch that rare beast, ‘a film by British women about British women’! The historical battle for the right of women to vote is shown through the life of an apolitical working class laundress (Carey Mulligan), who gets caught up in a demonstration for womenís rights. But as she meets more women active in the cause – and is kicked out of her home by her husband (Ben Whishaw) – she becomes more active in the movement, cutting telegraph wires and bombing mailboxes. Her personal drama is expertly combined with actual events and people, including Meryl Streep as feminist Emmeline Pankhurst. Suffragette is a must-see movie for anyone dedicated to the fight for rights of all people around the globe and at home. 106 min.
“Mulligan’s performance shows us just how much is at stake when a woman decides to wage war.” Julia Cooper, Toronto Globe and Mail.

WEBSITE

Feb
9
Tue
SUFFRAGETTE
Feb 9 @ 7:30 pm

(UK, 2015) Director: Sarah Gavron. Screenplay by Abi Morgan. Cast: Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Meryl Streep, Brendan Gleeson, Ben Whishaw.

Don’t miss the chance to watch that rare beast, ‘a film by British women about British women’! The historical battle for the right of women to vote is shown through the life of an apolitical working class laundress (Carey Mulligan), who gets caught up in a demonstration for womenís rights. But as she meets more women active in the cause – and is kicked out of her home by her husband (Ben Whishaw) – she becomes more active in the movement, cutting telegraph wires and bombing mailboxes. Her personal drama is expertly combined with actual events and people, including Meryl Streep as feminist Emmeline Pankhurst. Suffragette is a must-see movie for anyone dedicated to the fight for rights of all people around the globe and at home. 106 min.
“Mulligan’s performance shows us just how much is at stake when a woman decides to wage war.” Julia Cooper, Toronto Globe and Mail.

WEBSITE

Feb
10
Wed
SUFFRAGETTE
Feb 10 @ 7:30 pm

(UK, 2015) Director: Sarah Gavron. Screenplay by Abi Morgan. Cast: Carey Mulligan, Helena Bonham Carter, Meryl Streep, Brendan Gleeson, Ben Whishaw.

Don’t miss the chance to watch that rare beast, ‘a film by British women about British women’! The historical battle for the right of women to vote is shown through the life of an apolitical working class laundress (Carey Mulligan), who gets caught up in a demonstration for womenís rights. But as she meets more women active in the cause – and is kicked out of her home by her husband (Ben Whishaw) – she becomes more active in the movement, cutting telegraph wires and bombing mailboxes. Her personal drama is expertly combined with actual events and people, including Meryl Streep as feminist Emmeline Pankhurst. Suffragette is a must-see movie for anyone dedicated to the fight for rights of all people around the globe and at home. 106 min.
“Mulligan’s performance shows us just how much is at stake when a woman decides to wage war.” Julia Cooper, Toronto Globe and Mail.

WEBSITE

Feb
11
Thu
THE DANISH GIRL
Feb 11 @ 7:30 pm

(UK/Germany/US, 2015) Director: Tom Hooper. Screenplay by Lucinda Coxon, based on the book by David Ebershoff.

Cast: Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch, Amber Heard.

Director Tom Hooper calls 2015 ‘the tipping point’ for transgender rights, citing the critical raves won for actor Eddie Redmayne’s role as a young man in 1920s Denmark who follows his inner knowledge that he is meant to live as a woman. Last year’s Best Actor Oscar winner for The Theory of Everything, Redmayne gives a subtle performance as Einar Wegene, one of the first men to undergo sexual confirmation surgery. The film opens with Einar married to a fellow artist, played by the talented Alicia Vikander. As Einar transitions to Lili, the couple’s love for each other – and their shaky place in society – comes under threat. 120 min.
“As in The Danish Girl, in our country the side of pride is gaining ground, the shaming voices are dwindling in volume and influence, but the struggle is far from over.” Dana Stevens, Slate.

WEBSITE

Feb
12
Fri
THE DANISH GIRL
Feb 12 @ 7:30 pm

(UK/Germany/US, 2015) Director: Tom Hooper. Screenplay by Lucinda Coxon, based on the book by David Ebershoff.

Cast: Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch, Amber Heard.

Director Tom Hooper calls 2015 ‘the tipping point’ for transgender rights, citing the critical raves won for actor Eddie Redmayne’s role as a young man in 1920s Denmark who follows his inner knowledge that he is meant to live as a woman. Last year’s Best Actor Oscar winner for The Theory of Everything, Redmayne gives a subtle performance as Einar Wegene, one of the first men to undergo sexual confirmation surgery. The film opens with Einar married to a fellow artist, played by the talented Alicia Vikander. As Einar transitions to Lili, the couple’s love for each other – and their shaky place in society – comes under threat. 120 min.
“As in The Danish Girl, in our country the side of pride is gaining ground, the shaming voices are dwindling in volume and influence, but the struggle is far from over.” Dana Stevens, Slate.

WEBSITE

Feb
13
Sat
THE DANISH GIRL
Feb 13 @ 2:30 pm

(UK/Germany/US, 2015) Director: Tom Hooper. Screenplay by Lucinda Coxon, based on the book by David Ebershoff.

Cast: Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch, Amber Heard.

Director Tom Hooper calls 2015 ‘the tipping point’ for transgender rights, citing the critical raves won for actor Eddie Redmayne’s role as a young man in 1920s Denmark who follows his inner knowledge that he is meant to live as a woman. Last year’s Best Actor Oscar winner for The Theory of Everything, Redmayne gives a subtle performance as Einar Wegene, one of the first men to undergo sexual confirmation surgery. The film opens with Einar married to a fellow artist, played by the talented Alicia Vikander. As Einar transitions to Lili, the couple’s love for each other – and their shaky place in society – comes under threat. 120 min.
“As in The Danish Girl, in our country the side of pride is gaining ground, the shaming voices are dwindling in volume and influence, but the struggle is far from over.” Dana Stevens, Slate.

WEBSITE

THE DANISH GIRL
Feb 13 @ 7:30 pm

(UK/Germany/US, 2015) Director: Tom Hooper. Screenplay by Lucinda Coxon, based on the book by David Ebershoff.

Cast: Eddie Redmayne, Alicia Vikander, Ben Whishaw, Sebastian Koch, Amber Heard.

Director Tom Hooper calls 2015 ‘the tipping point’ for transgender rights, citing the critical raves won for actor Eddie Redmayne’s role as a young man in 1920s Denmark who follows his inner knowledge that he is meant to live as a woman. Last year’s Best Actor Oscar winner for The Theory of Everything, Redmayne gives a subtle performance as Einar Wegene, one of the first men to undergo sexual confirmation surgery. The film opens with Einar married to a fellow artist, played by the talented Alicia Vikander. As Einar transitions to Lili, the couple’s love for each other – and their shaky place in society – comes under threat. 120 min.
“As in The Danish Girl, in our country the side of pride is gaining ground, the shaming voices are dwindling in volume and influence, but the struggle is far from over.” Dana Stevens, Slate.

WEBSITE

Feb
14
Sun
CASABLANCA
Feb 14 @ 2:30 pm

(1942) Director: Michael Curtiz. Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, and Howard Koch based on the play by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. Musical Score: Max Steiner. Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Dooley Wilson, Paul Henries.

In a world thrown into chaos by brutal ideology, an apolitical American emigre (Humphrey Bogart) runs Rick’s Cafe in North Africa. Although he is unfazed by his customers (partisans, Nazis, emigres, swindlers and more), Rick’s cool is shaken when the woman who walked out on him in Paris (a luminous Ingrid Bergman) appears in his cafe. Bogart’s ambivalence between cynical self-preservation on one side and ethics and sacrifice on the other not only puts Casablanca on everyone’s Top Ten lists, but keeps it fresh. Fell free to join in the French National Anthem “La Marseillaise,” because “we’ll always have Paris.” Don’t miss the perfect Valentine’s Day movie on our big screen! Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay. 112 min.

CASABLANCA
Feb 14 @ 7:30 pm

(1942) Director: Michael Curtiz. Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, and Howard Koch based on the play by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. Musical Score: Max Steiner. Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Dooley Wilson, Paul Henries.

In a world thrown into chaos by brutal ideology, an apolitical American emigre (Humphrey Bogart) runs Rick’s Cafe in North Africa. Although he is unfazed by his customers (partisans, Nazis, emigres, swindlers and more), Rick’s cool is shaken when the woman who walked out on him in Paris (a luminous Ingrid Bergman) appears in his cafe. Bogart’s ambivalence between cynical self-preservation on one side and ethics and sacrifice on the other not only puts Casablanca on everyone’s Top Ten lists, but keeps it fresh. Fell free to join in the French National Anthem “La Marseillaise,” because “we’ll always have Paris.” Don’t miss the perfect Valentine’s Day movie on our big screen! Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay. 112 min.

Feb
15
Mon
CASABLANCA
Feb 15 @ 7:30 pm

(1942) Director: Michael Curtiz. Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, and Howard Koch based on the play by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. Musical Score: Max Steiner. Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Dooley Wilson, Paul Henries.

In a world thrown into chaos by brutal ideology, an apolitical American emigre (Humphrey Bogart) runs Rick’s Cafe in North Africa. Although he is unfazed by his customers (partisans, Nazis, emigres, swindlers and more), Rick’s cool is shaken when the woman who walked out on him in Paris (a luminous Ingrid Bergman) appears in his cafe. Bogart’s ambivalence between cynical self-preservation on one side and ethics and sacrifice on the other not only puts Casablanca on everyone’s Top Ten lists, but keeps it fresh. Fell free to join in the French National Anthem “La Marseillaise,” because “we’ll always have Paris.” Don’t miss the perfect Valentine’s Day movie on our big screen! Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay. 112 min.

Feb
16
Tue
CASABLANCA
Feb 16 @ 7:30 pm

(1942) Director: Michael Curtiz. Screenplay: Julius J. Epstein, Philip G. Epstein, and Howard Koch based on the play by Murray Burnett and Joan Alison. Musical Score: Max Steiner. Cast: Humphrey Bogart, Ingrid Bergman, Claude Rains, Peter Lorre, Sidney Greenstreet, Dooley Wilson, Paul Henries.

In a world thrown into chaos by brutal ideology, an apolitical American emigre (Humphrey Bogart) runs Rick’s Cafe in North Africa. Although he is unfazed by his customers (partisans, Nazis, emigres, swindlers and more), Rick’s cool is shaken when the woman who walked out on him in Paris (a luminous Ingrid Bergman) appears in his cafe. Bogart’s ambivalence between cynical self-preservation on one side and ethics and sacrifice on the other not only puts Casablanca on everyone’s Top Ten lists, but keeps it fresh. Fell free to join in the French National Anthem “La Marseillaise,” because “we’ll always have Paris.” Don’t miss the perfect Valentine’s Day movie on our big screen! Academy Awards: Best Picture, Best Director, Best Screenplay. 112 min.

Feb
21
Sun
CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
Feb 21 @ 2:30 pm

(Spain, Switzerland, 1965) Written and directed by Orson Welles, based on five plays of Shakespeare and Holinshed’s Chronicles by Raphael Holinshed. Cast: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, John Gielgud, Margaret Rutherford, Fernando Rey.

For cinephiles, the first important event of 2016 is the screening of the rarely seen, just-restored Chimes at Midnight, directed by and starring Orson Welles (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons). Welles was obsessed by the rascally Sir John Falstaff, who appears in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Chimes at Midnight, which Welles said was ‘about betrayal,’ finds a young Prince Hal (Keith Baxter) torn between his loyalties to his drinking buddy Falstaff (Welles), and to his father, Henry IV (John Gielgud). Using dialogue from five of Shakespeareís plays, Welles’ unique creation is filled with bittersweet comedy, visual imagination, and superb performances from two great actresses: Jeanne Moreau (Jules et Jim) and Margaret Rutherford (Blithe Spirit). 118 min.

“Chimes at Midnight is one of Welles’ peak achievements. Its depth of feeling seems very real, very deep indeed.” Four stars – Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune.

“WELLES’ FINEST SHAKESPEAREAN PRODUCTION, visually and emotionally a near-masterpiece. It should be back (it should be around forever) and it should be seen.” – Pauline Kael

“A FILM TO TREASURE. Welles brings several passages of genius.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
Feb 21 @ 7:30 pm

(Spain, Switzerland, 1965) Written and directed by Orson Welles, based on five plays of Shakespeare and Holinshed’s Chronicles by Raphael Holinshed. Cast: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, John Gielgud, Margaret Rutherford, Fernando Rey.

For cinephiles, the first important event of 2016 is the screening of the rarely seen, just-restored Chimes at Midnight, directed by and starring Orson Welles (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons). Welles was obsessed by the rascally Sir John Falstaff, who appears in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Chimes at Midnight, which Welles said was ‘about betrayal,’ finds a young Prince Hal (Keith Baxter) torn between his loyalties to his drinking buddy Falstaff (Welles), and to his father, Henry IV (John Gielgud). Using dialogue from five of Shakespeareís plays, Welles’ unique creation is filled with bittersweet comedy, visual imagination, and superb performances from two great actresses: Jeanne Moreau (Jules et Jim) and Margaret Rutherford (Blithe Spirit). 118 min.

“Chimes at Midnight is one of Welles’ peak achievements. Its depth of feeling seems very real, very deep indeed.” Four stars – Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune.

“WELLES’ FINEST SHAKESPEAREAN PRODUCTION, visually and emotionally a near-masterpiece. It should be back (it should be around forever) and it should be seen.” – Pauline Kael

“A FILM TO TREASURE. Welles brings several passages of genius.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

Feb
22
Mon
CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
Feb 22 @ 7:30 pm

(Spain, Switzerland, 1965) Written and directed by Orson Welles, based on five plays of Shakespeare and Holinshed’s Chronicles by Raphael Holinshed. Cast: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, John Gielgud, Margaret Rutherford, Fernando Rey.

For cinephiles, the first important event of 2016 is the screening of the rarely seen, just-restored Chimes at Midnight, directed by and starring Orson Welles (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons). Welles was obsessed by the rascally Sir John Falstaff, who appears in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Chimes at Midnight, which Welles said was ‘about betrayal,’ finds a young Prince Hal (Keith Baxter) torn between his loyalties to his drinking buddy Falstaff (Welles), and to his father, Henry IV (John Gielgud). Using dialogue from five of Shakespeareís plays, Welles’ unique creation is filled with bittersweet comedy, visual imagination, and superb performances from two great actresses: Jeanne Moreau (Jules et Jim) and Margaret Rutherford (Blithe Spirit). 118 min.

“Chimes at Midnight is one of Welles’ peak achievements. Its depth of feeling seems very real, very deep indeed.” Four stars – Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune.

“WELLES’ FINEST SHAKESPEAREAN PRODUCTION, visually and emotionally a near-masterpiece. It should be back (it should be around forever) and it should be seen.” – Pauline Kael

“A FILM TO TREASURE. Welles brings several passages of genius.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader

Feb
23
Tue
CHIMES AT MIDNIGHT
Feb 23 @ 7:30 pm

(Spain, Switzerland, 1965) Written and directed by Orson Welles, based on five plays of Shakespeare and Holinshed’s Chronicles by Raphael Holinshed. Cast: Orson Welles, Jeanne Moreau, John Gielgud, Margaret Rutherford, Fernando Rey.

For cinephiles, the first important event of 2016 is the screening of the rarely seen, just-restored Chimes at Midnight, directed by and starring Orson Welles (Citizen Kane, The Magnificent Ambersons). Welles was obsessed by the rascally Sir John Falstaff, who appears in a number of Shakespeare’s plays. Chimes at Midnight, which Welles said was ‘about betrayal,’ finds a young Prince Hal (Keith Baxter) torn between his loyalties to his drinking buddy Falstaff (Welles), and to his father, Henry IV (John Gielgud). Using dialogue from five of Shakespeareís plays, Welles’ unique creation is filled with bittersweet comedy, visual imagination, and superb performances from two great actresses: Jeanne Moreau (Jules et Jim) and Margaret Rutherford (Blithe Spirit). 118 min.

“Chimes at Midnight is one of Welles’ peak achievements. Its depth of feeling seems very real, very deep indeed.” Four stars – Michael Phillips, Chicago Tribune.

“WELLES’ FINEST SHAKESPEAREAN PRODUCTION, visually and emotionally a near-masterpiece. It should be back (it should be around forever) and it should be seen.” – Pauline Kael

“A FILM TO TREASURE. Welles brings several passages of genius.” – Roger Ebert, Chicago Sun-Times

“The one Welles film that deserves to be called lovely. Restrained and even serene, it is ample proof of how sensitive and subtle an artist he is.” – Dave Kehr, Chicago Reader